DRWA Research Grants

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the next round of diabetes research project funding is now open. Applications to be received by COB 30 July 2017.

New funding has been announced for 2 $80,000 WA based diabetes research projects for 2018. Application form including terms and conditions available here

Diabetes research grants awarded November 2016

We were thrilled to be able to award 2 new research grants for 2017 at our World Diabetes Day event in November. Details are as follows.

  • Research Project 1 - Dr Karen Rothacker Princess Margaret Hospital 'The effect of hyperglycaemia in standard and low insulin states on exercise performance compared to exercise performance in euglycaemia'. Read more here
  • Research Project 2 - Assistant Professor Vance Mathews The University of Western Australia 'Role of the sympathetic nervous system in regulation of sodium glucose co-transporter 2: implications for type 2 diabetes'. Read more here

Research project grants have now closed for application.

2 new research grants of $80,000 will be awarded in November 2016 for the following calendar year. Terms and conditions are included in the application form which can be viewed here.

2016 Diabetes Research Projects

2 diabetes research project grants were awarded in November 2015 for 2016

We are very proud to award the following:

1. Sunlight, nitric oxide, obesity and type 2 diabetes: exploring the role of brown adipose tissue - Dr Shelley Gorman; from The Kids Institute in Perth, WA

Dr Shelley Gorman A.jpg
This study will significantly improve our understanding of the mechanisms of action of sun exposure, and its important potential for clinical application.

These results will contribute towards the evidence-­‐base for health policies promoting activity and exercise outdoors, with sun exposure a key element in a framework to address lifestyle changes for type-­‐2 diabetes and obesity prevention. Our findings will also inform future intervention studies in humans that test the efficacy of sun exposure for reducing signs of type-­‐2 diabetes and obesity. By understanding these metabolic pathways modulated by ultraviolet radiation, this may open the door for new therapeutics for type-­‐2 diabetes and obesity.

 

2. Predicting which people with diabetes are at risk for heart disease - Professor Grant Morahan; from the WA Centre for Diabetes Research in Perth, WA.

Grant Morahan in lab.jpg

Professor Morahan and his team are working on developing a genetic test that will predict the risk of heart disease in people with type 2 diabetes decades before it develops giving people the best opportunity to prevent such an occurrence.


We look forward to bringing you an update on these research projects in the very near future.

 

2015 Diabetes Research Projects

Diabetes Research WA awarded two research grants of $75,000 for 2015 on the eve of World Diabetes Day, 13th November 2014.


1. Examine the functional role Cdk4 gene plays in regulating beta cell islet cell homeostasis

Associate Professor Gerard Hoyne; The University of Notre Dame Australia in Fremantle, WA

Professor Hoyne suspects a mutant protein could be triggering type 1 diabetes in patients who display no signs of an autoimmune attack, the usual cause of type 1 diabetes.

Most people with type 1 diabetes develop the disease when their body’s own immune system mistakenly destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas but in some patients, that’s not the case. These people show no evidence of autoimmune markers in the blood so what’s triggering their diabetes, and the death of their beta cells, is a mystery.

This study will investigate if these people are affected by a mutation in the Cdk4 gene that, in mouse models, have been shown to be linked to the development of type 1 diabetes.


Preliminary studies have revealed the recessive gene mutation caused a protein error that led to a critical loss in insulin production due to the premature death of islet beta cells. This eventually leads to the mice developing diabetes so part of the project also aims to uncover why this protein, which is much longer than normal, doesn’t work correctly and how it shortens the lifespan of beta cells and affects insulin secretion, he explained. Professor Hoyne has known for some time that Cdk4 is a diabetes susceptibility gene but unraveling this part of the mystery could improve the treatment of type 1 diabetes in the future, in particular with regards to creating important islet cell transplant therapies.

2. A randomized trial to improve and protect beta cells following kidney transplant

Dr Aron Chakera; Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Nedlands, WA

Dr Chakera is set to investigate if early intervention can help markedly reduce the number of kidney transplant patients who develop type 2 diabetes. Dr Chakera is also the head of translational renal research at the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research in Nedlands.

Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) affects up to one in two kidney transplant patients within a year of receiving their new organ and is linked to poorer graft and patient outcomes and an increased risk of death. Uncovering ways to reduce the number of patients who develop it is very important.

PTDM is believed to be triggered by increased insulin resistance and reduced insulin secretion, both of which can be side effects of the immunosuppressive drugs given to transplant patients to reduce the chances of their body rejecting their new organ. Traditionally, doctors concerned about PTDM have started with lifestyle modifications for patients with other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes such as obesity, and focused on optimising immunosuppressant therapy, progressing to drugs or insulin therapy to lower blood glucose levels if needed. The concern with this approach is it exposes many patients to significantly elevated blood glucose levels for many weeks which can spark complications, with some studies showing high blood sugar in the immediate period after transplantation can be a risk factor for acute rejection.


This clinical trial aims to discover the best method for earlier introduction of medications to help stablise blood sugar levels by bringing insulin or the drug sitagliptin combined with metformin into the post-transplant treatment regime earlier. It is hoped this will better protect the body’s insulin-producing beta cells and bring down the rates of PTDM.

2014 Diabetes Research projects

Predicting Risk of developing type 1 diabetes and diabetes complications

Professor Grant Morahan; The Centre for Diabetes Research

Professor Grant Morahan and his team have been working on finding a method to predict who will develop type 1 diabetes and who will go on to develop complications from diabetes. The belief is that this information lies in our genes.

Research will be conducted in conjunction with Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital whereby people who have had their DNA tested for T1 diabetes makers before will be asked to have their DNA tested for markers associated with kidney disease.

Brothers and sisters will also be asked to participate and have their DNA tested. If enough people get involved a test could be developed to predict which siblings are at low risk of developing diabetes.

 

Developing treatments for obesity induced diabetes - 'diabesity'

Assistant Professor Vance Mathews; Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research

Type 2 diabetes it a major health issue and needs urgent attention. It is of critical importance new treatments are developed to tackle and decrease type 2 diabetes.

Work from this group has implicated a number of circulating proteins in both obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Current work focuses on the circulating protein called TNFSF14. A team in The Laboratory for Metabolic Dysfunction has demonstrated that the protein TNFSF14 is increased when obesity and type 2 diabetes exists but the exact role of this protein is not known.

Investigations will now take place into the role of this protein in obesity and type 2 diabetes

The Specific Aims of the Project are to:

  1. Determine whether TNFSF14 protein from bone marrow cells reduces high fat diet induced obesity and type 2 diabetes.
  2. Ascertain whether circulating levels of TNFSF14 protein have decreased after weight loss has reversed type 2 diabetes in humans.

The exciting studies proposed have an overall aim of identifying new treatments for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Completed Research Projects

Ongoing Research Projects

2013

Developing functional insulin producing cells - ongoing research
Professor Grant Morahan & Associate Professor Fang-Xu Jiang: Centre for Diabetes Research

Understanding what role the protein 'SLIRP' plays in diabetes complications
Professor Peter Leedman; WAIMR

2012

Following the natural life of diabetes, the associated complications and other data in early adult life in childhood onset type 1 diabetes.
Associate Professor Elizabeth Davis and Matt Cooper - Telethon Kids Institute 

Final Report.pdf

Poster.pdf

Predicting risks and outcomes of diabetes - part of ongoing research at the Centre for Diabetes Research
Professor Grant Morahan: The Centre for Diabetes Research

2011

Identifying markers of cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes - due for completion late 2015
Nicole Milne; recipient of the Alex Cohen Diabetes Scholarship UWA

2010

Understanding the development of diabetic retinopathy - now complete. Report available soon
Lakshini Weeraekera, Alex Cohen Diabetes Scholarship; The Centre for Diabetes Research

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  • May 27, 2017
    Weight loss surgery is becoming more common in Australia https://t.co/AtHZftNs7U via @TheDRFWA
  • May 26, 2017
    Research grant reminder: 2 x $80,000 diabetes research grants now available for 2018. Details available at… https://t.co/0l7YmAPmvA via @TheDRFWA